‘CultureSummit Abu Dhabi 2019’ kicks off – First & Last Add

ABU DHABI, The opening panel session of ‘CultureSummit Abu Dhabi 2019’ was ‘Cultural Diplomacy and Responsibility in the Age of New Technology’, moderated by Zaki Nusseibeh, Minister of State.

Nusseibeh noted an increasing sense of pessimism and growing voice for isolationism, asking the panel what role cultural diplomacy plays in an increasingly polarised world, and how politicians may use it as an effective tool.

Former Prime Minister of Spain, Jose Luis Rodriquez Zapatero, noted that culture is the most effective tool diplomats can use, as it does not use force, but rather creativity and intelligence to connect and unite.

Jorge Fernando Quiroga, Former President of Bolivia and Member of Club de Madrid, said he blames the rise of protectionism around the world on the fact that “it is easy to blame someone who doesn’t look like you”; however he believes strongly in the value of cultural diplomacy, as culture is the common thread the binds us together.

He noted that while technology has brought great opportunities, it also poses significant challenges � the danger of technology is that instead of expanding minds, it can simply serve to reinforce what we already believe.

Bernardo Leon, Director General, Emirates Diplomatic Academy, noted that the reasons behind conflict and war are just cultural constructs, and we all have an equal responsibility to push for tolerance; to engage in productive dialogue. Cultural diplomacy has always been about interconnection – each diplomat represents a country with its own national interests, but culture is what makes diplomacy work in times of tension.

A panel session titled “How can media survive the age of technology?” was moderated by John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, and examined the rise of tech companies as distributors of news, looking at the ways that new technology and the rise of social media has transformed the relationship between producers and consumers of all forms of cultural media.

Prideaux introduced the session by noting how technology is upending business models; not only changing the channels and methods of journalism, but changing ways of reading. Readers have harder time deciding what information is worthy of their time; and many do not actually want to be challenged, but to have their prejudices confirmed.

Mina Al Oraibi, Editor-in-Chief of The National, noted how reader expectations have changed, with focus shifting from words to visuals, video, and audio. For her, the single biggest difference is that the job, and the news, is never done; with online and social channels, the news is always being refreshed and updated. Despite challenges, Al Oraibi feels that the National’s journalism has grown stronger, and sees the future of the news industry as becoming more of a personalised experience for readers.

Against the background of recent conflicts and increasing numbers of disasters, another session titled “Why is heritage a priority in crises?” addressed the contribution heritage can make to help communities affected by an emergency recover, moderated by Lazare Eloundou, UNESCO Director for Culture and Emergencies.

Alexander Kellner, Director, National Museum (Rio de Janeiro), Brazil relayed his recent experiences with natural disaster following the fire that destroyed much of his museum and its collection. He noted that the one upside of the disaster was to show the government the importance and preciousness of the heritage and scientific treasures that were lost. The museum received an outpouring of sympathy and help from around the world.

Marylene Barret Audouin, Cultural Heritage Conservator, iTE, spoke about her work in Yemen, and the hope she has for the future after seeing how dedicated the people of Yemen are to preserving what is left of their physical cultural heritage.

Jordanian artist Ala Younis spoke about her work, particularly her artwork ‘Plan for Greater Baghdad’, exhibited at the Venice Biennale. The work explores the ideological associations of Iraq’s buildings and monuments through parallel architectural narratives.

The Day One artistic performance was by award-winning contemporary performance artist Marcos Lutyens, who led the audience through a meditative mind session.

The afternoon sessions were workshops based on brainstorming key issues, through a cross-sectorial thinking process brought forward by the participants. On day one, workshops focused on elaborating the major questions posed in the plenary sessions. What do participants feel needs to be asked about how culture and technology can be effective for society across disciplines? CultureSummit Abu Dhabi is a unique global platform that brings together leaders in arts, heritage, media, museums, and technology to identify ways in which culture can play a pivotal role in raising awareness of global issues, building cultural bridges and promoting positive change. The event aims to determine an annual cultural agenda that will address the world’s pressing challenges and provide practical solutions.

Under the theme ‘Cultural Responsibility & New Technology’, this year’s programme features panel discussions, performances and interactive workshops crafted in collaboration with five cultural partners representing influential sectors in the fields of media, heritage, arts, museums and technology.

CultureSummit 2019’s five partners are The Economist Events, providing expertise in discussing issues related to media, information and its policies; UNESCO, addressing the tangible and intangible role of heritage in societal change; the Royal Academy of Arts, confronting pressing issues from the international art world; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, exploring how museums can shape the future of culture; and Google, heading the technology stream to craft discussions related to technology’s impact on arts, culture and media.

Source: WAM – Emirates News Agency

‘CultureSummit Abu Dhabi 2019’ kicks off – First & Last Add

ABU DHABI, The opening panel session of ‘CultureSummit Abu Dhabi 2019’ was ‘Cultural Diplomacy and Responsibility in the Age of New Technology’, moderated by Zaki Nusseibeh, Minister of State.

Nusseibeh noted an increasing sense of pessimism and growing voice for isolationism, asking the panel what role cultural diplomacy plays in an increasingly polarised world, and how politicians may use it as an effective tool.

Former Prime Minister of Spain, Jose Luis Rodriquez Zapatero, noted that culture is the most effective tool diplomats can use, as it does not use force, but rather creativity and intelligence to connect and unite.

Jorge Fernando Quiroga, Former President of Bolivia and Member of Club de Madrid, said he blames the rise of protectionism around the world on the fact that “it is easy to blame someone who doesn’t look like you”; however he believes strongly in the value of cultural diplomacy, as culture is the common thread the binds us together.

He noted that while technology has brought great opportunities, it also poses significant challenges � the danger of technology is that instead of expanding minds, it can simply serve to reinforce what we already believe.

Bernardo Leon, Director General, Emirates Diplomatic Academy, noted that the reasons behind conflict and war are just cultural constructs, and we all have an equal responsibility to push for tolerance; to engage in productive dialogue. Cultural diplomacy has always been about interconnection – each diplomat represents a country with its own national interests, but culture is what makes diplomacy work in times of tension.

A panel session titled “How can media survive the age of technology?” was moderated by John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, and examined the rise of tech companies as distributors of news, looking at the ways that new technology and the rise of social media has transformed the relationship between producers and consumers of all forms of cultural media.

Prideaux introduced the session by noting how technology is upending business models; not only changing the channels and methods of journalism, but changing ways of reading. Readers have harder time deciding what information is worthy of their time; and many do not actually want to be challenged, but to have their prejudices confirmed.

Mina Al Oraibi, Editor-in-Chief of The National, noted how reader expectations have changed, with focus shifting from words to visuals, video, and audio. For her, the single biggest difference is that the job, and the news, is never done; with online and social channels, the news is always being refreshed and updated. Despite challenges, Al Oraibi feels that the National’s journalism has grown stronger, and sees the future of the news industry as becoming more of a personalised experience for readers.

Against the background of recent conflicts and increasing numbers of disasters, another session titled “Why is heritage a priority in crises?” addressed the contribution heritage can make to help communities affected by an emergency recover, moderated by Lazare Eloundou, UNESCO Director for Culture and Emergencies.

Alexander Kellner, Director, National Museum (Rio de Janeiro), Brazil relayed his recent experiences with natural disaster following the fire that destroyed much of his museum and its collection. He noted that the one upside of the disaster was to show the government the importance and preciousness of the heritage and scientific treasures that were lost. The museum received an outpouring of sympathy and help from around the world.

Marylene Barret Audouin, Cultural Heritage Conservator, iTE, spoke about her work in Yemen, and the hope she has for the future after seeing how dedicated the people of Yemen are to preserving what is left of their physical cultural heritage.

Jordanian artist Ala Younis spoke about her work, particularly her artwork ‘Plan for Greater Baghdad’, exhibited at the Venice Biennale. The work explores the ideological associations of Iraq’s buildings and monuments through parallel architectural narratives.

The Day One artistic performance was by award-winning contemporary performance artist Marcos Lutyens, who led the audience through a meditative mind session.

The afternoon sessions were workshops based on brainstorming key issues, through a cross-sectorial thinking process brought forward by the participants. On day one, workshops focused on elaborating the major questions posed in the plenary sessions. What do participants feel needs to be asked about how culture and technology can be effective for society across disciplines? CultureSummit Abu Dhabi is a unique global platform that brings together leaders in arts, heritage, media, museums, and technology to identify ways in which culture can play a pivotal role in raising awareness of global issues, building cultural bridges and promoting positive change. The event aims to determine an annual cultural agenda that will address the world’s pressing challenges and provide practical solutions.

Under the theme ‘Cultural Responsibility & New Technology’, this year’s programme features panel discussions, performances and interactive workshops crafted in collaboration with five cultural partners representing influential sectors in the fields of media, heritage, arts, museums and technology.

CultureSummit 2019’s five partners are The Economist Events, providing expertise in discussing issues related to media, information and its policies; UNESCO, addressing the tangible and intangible role of heritage in societal change; the Royal Academy of Arts, confronting pressing issues from the international art world; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, exploring how museums can shape the future of culture; and Google, heading the technology stream to craft discussions related to technology’s impact on arts, culture and media.

Source: WAM – Emirates News Agency